The Detroit News Names CBBM a Top Gift for Craft Beer Lovers!

“For the beer nerd who is interested in the business aspect of the industry, check out the memoir “Craft Beer Bar Mitzvah” by Shmaltz Brewing owner Jeremy Cowan. The book tells the true story of the 13 years it took the San Francisco-based company to become one of the best craft brewers in America. Find it at www.craftbeerbarmitzvah.com

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20121122/ENT03/211220304#ixzz2D45yPIcQ

Back to School: Hitting the Bottles and Books at Lehigh University

Earlier this year, Jeremy spoke for a group of invited guests at Lehigh University about his whirlwind journey in the craft beer business. He’Brew beer flowed freely for guests 21 and over, while Jeremy read from Craft Beer Bar Mitzvah. The response was tremendous and we thank Rabbi Seth Goren for these kind words:

“In addition to opening up about his fascinating professional journey, Jeremy humorously and humbly shared his breathtaking range of knowledge about craft beer.  He was personable, gracious and warm, and all present highly enjoyed themselves.”

San Francisco Chronicle

Jeremy Cowan: Shmaltz Brewing chief writes memoir

by Louis Peitzman, Special to The Chronicle

Thursday, February 2, 2012

Beer and Judaism go together like – well, by all accounts they don’t. But although the Jewish religion may not have a rich history of brewing, Shmaltz Brewing founder Jeremy Cowan notes that the “Jews don’t drink beer” stereotype is way off the mark.

“As I’ve said for years, and as we know from experience,” he says, “the Jewish fraternity guys, like my father, probably drink just as much beer as the non-Jewish fraternities next door.”

With the release of his book “Craft Beer Bar Mitzvah: How It Took 13 Years, Extreme Jewish Brewing & Circus Sideshow Freaks to Make Shmaltz Brewing Co. an International Success,” Cowan tells the story of his brewing company’s humble Bay Area beginnings, and how Shmaltz Brewing grew.

Writing it all down was always part of the plan, but when Cowan founded his company in 1996, he wasn’t sure how far it would go.

“For many years when I was starting the business, and it was such a struggle to break even financially, I always thought that it would make a fantastic story,” he says, “even if it wasn’t a spectacular business.”

The impressive growth of Shmaltz Brewing – including two lines of beer, He’brew Beer and Coney Island Craft Lagers, as well as having sold more than 10 million bottles of beer to date – should serve as inspiration to anyone thinking about starting his or her own business. At the same time, “Craft Beer Bar Mitzvah” highlights the challenges Cowan and his employees have faced – not to mention the amount of work it takes to keep the company afloat.

“We really are living the dream,” Cowan says, but “we really do work incredibly hard for such small margins, no paid sick days and obsessive dreams about work.”

Although “Craft Beer Bar Mitzvah” is a memoir of sorts, it was important to Cowan that he leave the story unfinished. After all, this is far from the end of Shmaltz Brewing.

“The point of the book was to give a glimpse of a small business and an owner’s perspective while in the throes of the project,” Cowan says. “The reader at the end of the tale realizes that we are still in the middle of the story and are writing the adventure every day we stay in business.”

And while “Craft Beer Bar Mitzvah” does pair well with Shmaltz Brewing’s beers, Cowan says his book should also appeal to nondrinkers. It goes without saying, but being Jewish isn’t a requirement either.

“Anybody who has dreamt of or is obsessed by owning their own business, and anyone who gets a kick out of the challenges involved … should be able to appreciate the book,” Cowan says. “My goal from the beginning was to simply write a compelling story that would stand on its own as a meaningful work of writing.”

This article appeared on page G – 21 of the San Francisco Chronicle

CBBM Named One of “The Best Jewish Food Books of 2011″ !!!

The Best Jewish Food Books of 2011
By Devra Ferst

“Craft Beer Bar Mitzvah” by Jeremy Cowan with James Sullivan
Many a passionate cook and home brewer have fantasized about starting an artisanal food company someday. Jeremy Cowan, the founder and owner of He’Brew (the only American Jewish beer company we know of) documents his company’s coming of age in the beer biz in this beer-memoir. While Cowan’s book won’t give you an exact guide for how to start your own beer company it’ll give you insight into just how far enthusiasm and a bit of shtick can take you.

Shmaltz Brewing Founder Visits St. Louis

by STL Hops

While it’s always cool to meet a brewer from your favorite breweries, they’re something slightly cooler about meeting the owner. It takes some very big cojones to start your own business and I think there is something special about meeting the guys who have the gumption to go out and make their own road.

One of those guys who made a go of it is Jeremy Cowan of Shmaltz Brewing Company. Jeremy will be in St. Louis later this week to promote his new book Craft Beer Bar Mitzvah, a memoir detailing what it took to start Shmaltz.

If you’d like to meet Jeremy he’ll be speaking at the Jewish Community Center as part of the St. Louis Jewish Book Festival on Thursday, November 17th at 7:30PM (you can purchase tickets here.) He’ll also be signing copies of his book at Left Bank Books (the downtown location) on Saturday, November 19th from 4PM to 6PM.

After the book signing, Jeremy will be heading next door to the Bridge to enjoy some Messiah Bold and RIPA on draft. This is a great opportunity to meet one of the guys who helped to make this US craft beer renaissance a reality.

The Jew & The Carrot

From The Jewish Daily Forward’s blog, The Jew & The Carrot

Mixing Bowl: Sukkot Recipes; Matzo Ball Ramen
By Devra Ferst

Still looking for some delicious recipes for the holiday? Check out a Sukkot-Inspired Harvest Feast and a lovely story about celebrating Sukkot in the orthodox neighborhood Crown Heights in Brooklyn. [Saveur]

Myra Goodman, co-founder of Earthbound Farm, is a quiet and unlikely pioneer for organic farming but, “If you’re buying organic baby spinach at a Whole Foods in December, chances are it’s from Earthbound,” writes Ben Harris. [Tablet]Chef

Target’s fish is going sustainable: “The second largest discount retailer in the U.S. announced Thursday that it will sell only sustainable, traceable fish by 2015.” [The LA Times]

Egypt’s ban on exporting palm fronds which are used as lulavs during Sukkot has shaken up the market for the crop. [Tablet]

We hear “Craft Beer Bar Mitzvah: How It Took 13 Years, Extreme Jewish Brewing, and Circus Sideshow Freaks to Make Shmaltz Brewing Company an International Success”, by Shmaltz Brewing founder Jeremy Cowan, is out. The business memoir will give you the inside story of this craft beer company — with some shtick, of course. [Fork in the Road]

Seems like America just can’t get enough brisket. Here’s another brisket tale. [The Atlantic]

Chef Jonathon Sawyer is serving a matzo ball ramen soup at his new Cleveland restaurant, Noodlecat. Definitely one of the stranger mash-ups we’ve heard of. [The Daily Meal]

Check it out here!